Sonardyne leads ocean autonomous systems collaboration project

20 November 2018

Sonardyne International has initiated a collaborative project to drive a major step change in ocean system autonomy for long-endurance autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). The ambition of the Innovate UK-supported Precise Positioning for Persistent AUVs (P3AUV) project is to enable AUVs to operate at high levels of navigation performance with less surface support and for longer periods.

With partners L3 ASV and the National Oceanography Centre (NOC), Sonardyne will focus on longer-term navigational accuracy for AUVs in deep water, while reducing power requirements and increasing autonomy in marine operations. The P3AUV project will involve trials using Sonardyne's leading underwater positioning technology on the NOC's Autosub Long Range (ALR) and L3 ASV's C-Worker 7 autonomous surface vehicle (ASV). The project, which will include trials in Loch Ness in December, is due to run until late 2019.

The project will focus on three key areas: increasing long-duration navigational accuracy by integrating low- and high-power Inertial Navigation System (INS) sensors; improving positioning accuracy while underwater vehicles descend and ascend through the water column, through the integration of Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) current measurement capabilities and INS technologies with on board processing of data; and enabling ASV deployment of seafloor positioning transponders.

Sonardyne International Ltd
Ocean House
Blackbushe Business Park
Yateley
Hants GU46 6GD
UK
T: +44 1252 872288
F: +44 1252 876100
W: www.sonardyne.co.uk

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